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«The job of journalist gives you the opportunity to tell stories and each story is different, it enriches you and brings something into your life».

Alessio Zucchini, journalist, correspondent of Tg1 and former conductor of Unomattina, takes a picture of Umbria, where he was born and where he keeps memories related to his family and his childhood friends.

 

Alessio Zucchini

What is your bond with Umbria?

I have been living in Rome for 18 years, but Umbria is, and will always be, the place of my family and my childhood friends. I do not go back as often as I would like, but it’s always in my heart. I was born in Umbertide and stayed there until the end of high school, then I went to Turin for the university and I came back to Perugia to attend the Rai Journalism School.

As a journalist and observer of reality: what is your opinion on this region?

I consider it as a happy island, a still peaceful place and a true explosion of colours. Of course, it must be said that it should begin to open its eyes a little: it should become more dynamic on some areas. It is closed on itself and the media do not help.

Do you live in Rome, from the outside how Umbria is perceived?

Obviously, as always happens, those who do not live in a place always find it very beautiful. The Romans, for example, have a positive opinion of Umbria.

Your parents have a radio, Radio Free Wave, so you have always lived in the world of information. Why did you decide to do this job?

I was born in radio. As a kid I used to spend Sunday afternoons with radio commentators, then I talked, recorded and mixed. I had a lot of fun. Obviously this also helped me to choose the profession of journalist. But above all it was my curiosity and the desire to tell the world. I’ve always been a curious guy with a passion for travel.

Is there a work experience that particularly affected you?

In my life I have done many jobs, from the waiter to the night porter in a hotel when I was studying in Turin, but journalism is the job that gives me the opportunity to tell stories every day. Every time you go out for a service or do an interview, discover something new: a life, a story, an experience. I could say that the last service I did was very engaging and a strong experience: I was in Libya in the detention centres for migrants. They are real prisons, claustrophobic places. When you come back from these places you are richer in experiences that you will hardly forget.

You were presenter of Unomattina, and correspondent too: what is the role you likes best?

The envoy certainly, because you can tell stories. But I admit that I like to vary, so the role of presenter, both of a television program and of the news program, were fun and interesting.

How would you describe Umbria in three words?

Charming, calm, sly.

The first thing that comes to mind thinking of this region…

Affections, family and friendship.

Italy is considered an open-air museum by UNESCO. Churches, palaces, Greek, Etruscan, Arab, Longobard Roman, bridges, paintings, frescoes, statues. In Italy everything is art.

Italy hides an artistic heritage that few know and that summarizes in itself the stories of every era: the stones. The stones are obviously made of stone, they do not move but they speak in silence.
Through their paths, they tell stories of travel, of betrayals, of love and curiosity. There are smooth or chiseled stones and stones with inscriptions or even with bas-reliefs, imported stones and bare stones and stones on stones. Then there is color, grain and texture. In short, what looks like a simple piece of construction encompasses an infinite story.

The color of the stones

Perched on top of the hills of central Italy, stone mountains shaped like towns and cities are visible. Each region has a different color. It starts from the gray of the “pietra serena” in Tuscany to get to the brown of the tuff in Etruria. Assisi is pink like the stone of the Subasio that dominates it so as the plateaux of San Terenziano has its pink stone. Moreover, there is the travertine in Lazio and the white stone of Lecce and so on. Simple, just know what is the stone of the area and there is nothing else to see. It is not exact, this is just the beginning.

 

Gualdo Cattaneo

The Mother Church

Cinema and TV have made us know the House on the prairie or the American terraced houses strictly made of wood, swept away by hurricanes or burned from top to bottom. Italy, on the other hand, has marbles and stones that can’t burn, or fly, which have been still standing for 2000 years and that have been distributed like a deck of cards.
To learn how to look and under stand them, it is better to start from a small town like Gualdo Cattaneo that overlooks the Puglia valley and stands above the Umbrian valley. From the fortified tower of Gualdo Cattaneo, Spello, Foligno and also the fortress of Spoletoare visible. If you see, you are seen then you are coveted. Gualdo Cattaneo was the object of desire of the cities in that area, and Pope Alexander VI Borgia bought it to build the fortress. Strong point, impregnable by the dreadful warriors of Perugia. The ascent toward the keep, then the square and the Mother Church, the center of the village is reached.
It starts from the church, even from the foundations of the church that are visible from the street behind the apse. The church lays on gigantic and heavy stones, brought there by the legendary Cyclops so firm that no earthquake has never demolished them. Difficult to find more solid foundations. They were the ancient walls of Gualdo Cattaneo. Why did they build a church on the ancient walls? Because nothing is thrown away and because if it is solid and ready it is usable If it is beautiful and decorative, it is moved to another place. On the facade of the church are the symbols of the four evangelists. Two are white and two pink. All imported stone: the pink ones from San Terenziano and white ones from Giano dell’Umbria. Then you enter the church and descend into the crypt.
The crypt, like almost all the crypts, is built with ancient materials. Columns and capitals that once layed somewhere abandoned, remains of the imposing buildings of Roman times, were used there. This was the best reuse of them, because the Roman marbles, even the imperial ones, were fused together to obtain bricks.

A tour among the stones

 Poverty and fundamentalist religions caused incalculable damages. We have lost an infinite number of works of art, but we still have them, even if they are not in their original shape. Leaving the Church and walking through the village, there are gothic or modified gothic windows, travertines, existing only elsewhere – perhaps in Giano – inserted as a point of support in the buildings. Here and there are stones with inscriptions from every era, from Roman times onwards, inserted because of the lack of a brick or simply because they were decorative or because they remembered an event. Ancient entrances hidden in the walls are discovered one and a half meters above the ground, but with the floor level unchanged. The fear of the rats suggested to build in safety. It was used a flying wooden ladder, which in the evening was retired inside the house. A little like the Walsers, who lived in the Alps, and built their wooden houses on stone mushrooms.
If you’d like toh ave a trip among the stones, and learn more, you can contact the municipality of Gualdo Cattaneo, which organizes guided tours under the supervision of dr. Andrea Peruzzi, a true expert in lapidary art and epigraphy. You will have fun!

«From the green heart of Italy to the heart of everyone».

Serena Scorzoni is from Perugia and one of the most famous faces of Rai News 24. Enter our homes to tell us about daily news and, as a careful journalist, she couldn’t avoid taking a picture of her Umbria. A land to which she is very fond, but she has a critical attitude towards Umbria too “Politics have never had the courage to tackle the problems that isolate our region geographically. They don’t care about it, until they’ll face the harsh reality, I hope they’ll wake up”.

 

Serena Scorzoni

Serena, first of all: what is your relationship with this region?

My parents and my family live in Perugia. I therefore have an indissoluble link. Here there are my roots, but I decided to put myself away from the security of my land.

Thanks to your work, you tell the reality: how do you consider the Umbrian reality? What are its strengths and weaknesses?

Umbria is a wonderful land, but like all things full of light, there are also shadows. I would like it to be more open and welcoming, less rough and closed. But it is for me the place of the soul.

How would you describe it, apart from the green heart of Italy?

Art, spirituality, food & wine, but also the tenacity and courage of the Umbrian women and men. I think of the many companies, our fellow countrymen who made themselves known in the world because of culture, science and  entrepreneurship. From the green heart of Italy of Umbria to the heart of all.

Several events, I think of the earthquake and the Meredith case, have offered a vision of Perugia and of Umbria not entirely true, or maybe yes: what do you think?

I followed closely the dramatic story of Meredith and the whole media circus that for years has told a part of the story. Of course, the crime has given a very negative effect on our city and our region. It tore a veil of hypocrisy on the idyllic image of Umbria. Since then, politics have not had the courage to tackle the knots that isolate our region geographically. I mean that everyone sat on a vision of convenience, until they’ll face the harsh reality. I hope they’ll wake up.

You attended the RAI Journalism School in Perugia: what would you recommend to a youngster who is thinking of  undertaking this creer?

My advice is twofold: wear comfortable shoes to tell the reality of the street and never stop learning what journalism means.

You worked for a long time for the Tgr Umbria: do you have an amusing anecdote – which you’d like to tell us, which happened during that period?

There is one about the live coverage from Gubbio on the occasion of  the “Festa dei Ceri”, I was literally thrown into the atmosphere of the event. If I think about it, I still laugh today.

How would you describe Umbria in three words?

Sun, heart, love… No joke: quality of life.

The first thing that comes to your mind thinking of this region…

The sunset on the Trasimeno Lake.

The art of Joan Mirò on display at Palazzo della Corgna in Castiglione del Lago

“Ubu Roi” (1966)

 

The art exhibition is visible until the November 4th inside the rooms of the noble building designed by Vignola and Galeazzo Alessi, which is named after  the Marquis della Corgna. The exposition is curated by Andrea Pontalti, promoted by the municipality of Castiglione del Lago and organised by Sistema Museo and Lagodarte in collaboration with Aurora Group.

The vision of Mirò

The event gives the opportunity to discover this wonderful artist through seventy graphic works that are part of four complete sets. They were created during a period of ten years: from 1966 to 1976, in the artist’s maturity. Ubu Roi (1966) is composed of thirteen colourful lithographs, in which shapes and  volumes seem to move freely in the space. Furthermore,  Le Lézard aux Plumes d’Or (1971), Maravillas con variaciones acrósticas en el jardin de Miró (1975) might be admired in the spaces of the palaces: work arts characterized by black marks and vivid colours. Another remarkable work is Le Marteau sans maître (1976), a tribute to the poet René Chair, one of the most distinguished personalities of the twentieth-century French literature. These art works tell the artist’s poetic dream and its peculiarity, which consists of transforming the fantastical images into a personal language. These lithographs show the relationship between text and illustration that characterize that artistic phase: a book is something that has to be carved in the marble – in the artist’s opinion.

 

An immersion in colours

The use of colour and the very personal world of marks derives from the Mirò’s approach to the world of art: his curiosity, the capacity of renewing himself and of exploring different paths. The dark marks and the bright colours, from blue to yellow give life to personal dream visions. Visiting the exhibition means immersing yourself in the language of the extraordinary Catalan artist thanks to less known art works, but which offer an important glimpse of his expressive power.

 

“Le Lézard aux Plumes d’Or” (1971)

 


Palazzo della Corgna

«Insist, persist, reach and conquer»

This is the phrase which represents Fiammetta Rossi most. She is 23 year old, from Foligno and she is studying law at University. Last March, Fiammetta won two golden medals at the University World Cup shooting in Malesya: one in the Women Individual competition, the other in the Team competition. “Insist, persist, reach and conquer is a phrase that my grandfather used to tell me and in which I believe very much, so much so that I tattooed it”.
Fiammetta – which is part of the Golden Flames Sports Group – is carrying on the tradition of family champions in shooting, after grandfather Nando and dad Luciano, starting by chance this discipline: «For nine years I rided, then something changed».

 

Fiammetta Rossi

What is it like to have two golden medals around your neck?

It is something unique. I trained a lot for this and Iam still working hard to succeed in my career and it is something which I believe in a lot. The beauty of this sport is that you retire late, you can practice even over 50 years, so I still have time.

Your father Luciano is the president of Fitav (Italian Federation of Shooting in Flight): so it was a destiny already written?

Not exactly. For nine years of my life I practiced horseback riding, then one day watching the London Olympic games I noticed a friend of mine who competed in shooting and I decided to try. I started by playing, I liked it and so I continued.  After all, as child, my dream was to be a policewoman on horseback: now I am part of the Golden Flames Sports Group of the State Police.

The Tokyo 2020 Olympic games are approaching: do you hope to go?

I would really like. I’m in the team and I want to believe it!  My dream is participating in them: already the mere fact of being there repays the sacrifices you faced to get there. All athletes dream of Olympics games as the they remain and will always be the Olympics. If you win a medal there you enter the legend. I am working every day for this, making sacrifices and training constantly. I still have a lot to do.

Do you have any important appointments in the next months?

Next year I am participating in the University Olympics, so I’ll experience the Olympic context I already know that I will like it a lot.

A Little curiosity: where do you keep the medals?

I keep them at home, I must have them nearby. Every now and then I pick them up, cuddle them I look at them and relive the emotions that I felt at the moment of my victories and I think: «They are mine!»

Let’s talk a little about Umbria: what is your link with this region?

I love it a lot. I love its landscapes, the food and the green that relaxs me. I like everything about it. Travelling is nice, but coming back home is nicer too. I was born in Montefalco and I live in Foligno now, but I lo venature and animals a lot and I love being in touch with them.

 

You love animals: so, you don’t shoot at them?

I have never practiced hunting, but I respect those who practice it. It is an ancient art and I am not integralist in this regard. Also because, true hunters respect nature very much.

Can the shotgun give other satisfactions to Umbria apart from Diana Bacosi and you? Are there any promising young people?

In Umbria there is a very interesting youth sector and we are doing a great job with them. I am very confident.

How would you describe Umbria in three words?

Passion, tradition and well-being. Although three words are not enough to describe Umbria.

The first thing that comes to mind thinking of this region…

The house, my roots and love. I am a very traditionalist girl.

On September 7th at Palazzo Gallenga is going to be launched the exhibition Stele by Enrico Antonielli; the painter deals not only with sculpture but also with painting.

The sculptor and painter Enrico Antonielli was born in Perugia; he graduated in Philosophy at the University La Sapienza of Rome and in the 1970s he became the director of the CICoM (Center for Information and Communication of Mass of the Umbria Region). He collaborated with the roman magazine Philosophy and Society and later he attended the courses of Painting and Sculpture at the Academy in Perugia. Here he graduated in History of Art and begun to exhibit as a sculptor.

 

The exhibit

In the exhibition, visible from September 7th to 14th, the artist seems to move in the spatio-temporal interstices of the work, where art – the «extreme enigma» according to Malraux’s famous aphorism – triumphs for its inaccessibility, its continual moving beyond, like a moving target.
Historical and archaeological studies tell us that the commemorative, celebratory and votive function of the stele. The stele is a document in stone or bronze which commits a private or public event to eternity; the message, therefore, written or sculpted, is not scratched by time.
The exhibited works, characterized by the presence of lacerations and holes on the surface, recall fossil lakes and craters similar to lunar desert plagas; fundamental in the material: aluminum.

Mirrored Surfaces

Giuliano Serafini, international critic, expert in Burri and curator of exhibitions in Athens and New York underlines the fact that the artist performs a work of de-semantization of the archetype because only this can make the work win a significant autonomy.
The same critic also writes: «The reflective aluminium is itself a luminous emanation through which the image bounces and returns to the sender, it is an iridescent and aleatory extension on which everything passes and slides. It is a metaphor of the Hic et Nunc that denies time the opportunity to leave lasting impressions; therefore, material destined to be unable to “remember”, to entrust any memory to eternity».
The use of the mirroring surface metaphorically represents the drama of existential risk, the impassable limit between the phenomenal world and the noumen one, the solution of continuity between two irreconcilable worlds.
The interpretation of the mirroring surface defines the concept of limit, an inert instrument of the light that rebounds and reflects and, with its phenomenal reflection, it brings us back inexorably to the consciousness of our human condition, existential and finite.
The author emphasizes that his aesthetic perspective is part of the art-truth, which has a long history, which starts from the famous Portrait of the Arnolfini spouses by Van Eyck, where the painter through the mirror reveals what lies behind and beyond the perspective representation before the easel, and its presence in the room, with an extension of the space in a reality augmented to 360 °, which accounts for all the present reality at the time, including painter.

 

Fifty years after Emma Dessau Goitein’s death, Perugia talks about a great woman. Emma lived the last years of her life in Perugia, in the city of Perugino and Pinturicchio, in the city that still preserves some of her works in the Museum of the Academy of Perugia, which is placed near a street entitled to her.

For the anniversary of his death, the Academy Pietro Vannucci and the Municipality of Perugia create an exhibition to present a rich selection of works from important public and private collections; the Academy holds ten works by Emma.

An artistic and biographic development

The exhibition develops in two paths: one at the Academy and the other at the Civic Museum of Palazzo della Penna, visible until September 9th. The exhibition curated by Fedora Boco, Maria Luisa Martella and Gabriella Steindler Moscati, embraces a very wide chronological range: from the late nineteenth-century formation to the last works of the 1940s, revealing the articulated artistic and biographical development of the author. Emma was born in Karlsruhe in 1877 from an observant Jewish family. Since she was a child she was conscious of her artistic vocation, in fact she attended courses dedicated only to men and she interested about politics. Emma was educated by her mother because her father died when she was a child; and her mother manages to reconcile respect for tradition with modernity. In 1901 she moved to Italy, first to Bologna and then to Perugia, for love of Bernardo Dessau.

 

Family photo

An exciting everyday life

The family is one of the main sources of inspiration for the painter, her favorite subjects are in fact her husband Bernardo, absorbed and concentrated, of her sons Fanny and Gabor, depicted in the various phases of their lives, as well as those of other family members like her beloved brother Ernst. Another subject widely represented by the artist is the landscape; in the landscapes Emma relies on the fresh impression plein air, she often paints the heights of Monteluce, where she lived and painted, and the places where she went on holiday.

Drawings and Xylographies

The graphic section instead is hosted at the Academy and includes drawings and xylographies that cross the entire artistic production of the author. The xylography is certainly the art in which Emma elaborates the religious and cultural world representing biblical subjects. «With this exhibition» highlighted the councilor for culture Severini «continues the cycle on the artists who animated Perugia with their art in the last century, witnesses of an artistic fervor that characterized it incisively. Emma produced paintings and engravings of a poignant intensity».

 

 

Self-portrait

“I experienced the countryside from an arcadian point of view in the first part of my life; with a wish for innovation and above all, under a cultural outlook in the second one».

Maria Grazia Marchetti Lungarotti is a cultured woman: as it is easily understood, talking to her. She is courteous and kind as a woman of other times. Her passion for art and archeology, for wine and olive oil, and the rigor in her studies are the cornerstones of her life. A life also based on discipline: “I have never left much time for amusement and I have never been a “Latin mother.” I have always demanded a lot from my children and this has borne fruit “. In 2011 she was awarded the highest honor conferred by the President of the Italian Republic: Knight of the Grand Cross of the Order of Merit of the Italian Republic.
In 1987 with his second husband, Giorgio Lungarotti (they had already created the Wine Museum in 1974) opened the Lungarotti Onlus Foundation, of which she is the director, to promote and enhance the culture of wine. Among the activities of the Foundation, today, there is the management of the two museum complexes: the Museum of Wine and the Olive and Olive Oil Museum, dedicated to wine as well as to olive oil. They are private museums which host precious art collections and are visited by tourists from all over the world.

 

Chiara Lungarotti, Maria Grazia Marchetti Lungarotti, Teresa Severini

How did you come up with the idea of ​​ opening the Wine Museum and later the Olive Oil Museum?

I joined the Umbrian culture and its typical products, a combination that belonged to me. I am an art historian and an archivist: from my interests in the cultural field came the idea of ​​combining high quality production – which was started by my husband, an enlightened entrepreneur, first in Umbria to do that – with a rigorous and complex opening on the historical and artistic aspects related to wine: we speak about Umbria, but above all, about the Mediterranean area. The second museum, the MOO, was opened in 2000, when my husband had already disappeared, and it responded to the same needs to get out of a merely agricultural-productive perspective. In both of them, you can take a real journey through time to discover origins, mythology, imaginary, and other many aspects of the two products.

The New York Times in a review, called The Wine Museum: “The best in Italy”. It was a great satisfaction…

Not only in Italy, but in Europe. It is an unusual reality that proposes a 5,000 year journey through art collections including cups, jugs, amphorae, pottery, medieval, Renaissance and baroque ceramics up to contemporary ones, ancient engravings, as well as ethnographic collections. Both are family-friendly museums, also thanks to the cognitive paths dedicated to children.

For the town of Torgiano they are really meaningful.

Definitely. my husband and me wanted to promote an area of ​​Umbria, very beautiful in terms of landscape, but little known despite the proximity to Perugia and Assisi. The realization of the two museums was very demanding, but today the result is a specialized complex that gives voice not only to the territory, but, to the Italy of wine. This project underlines the tourist potential of our land.

Mrs. Lungarotti what is your bond with Umbria?

I am umbrian and not etruscan – she smiles – a naturalized “Perugina” from Gubbio. With this region I have a very strong bond, which is conneted to the land itself, to culture and to wine. They are the reasons why I have taken this path and I have achieved these results.

How do you see the Umbrian and the Perugia reality, in a social and in artistic point of view? 

I can see interesting effects and a real interest in art, music and culture. Umbria is a fascinating land, unfortunately back compared to other regions, Tuscany for example. We have a beautiful and compelling history, under many aspects. There are some periods of our history which deserve to be discovered such as Umbria during the phase of the Municipalities. In these days an exhibition dedicated to this historical period is taking place in Gubbio: “One day in the Middle Ages. Daily life in the Italian cities of the eleventh-fifteenth centuries”. We contributed through a substantial loan of art works by MUVIT to this event.

Is there a project by the Lungarotti Foundation that you particularly care about?

We have so many exhibitions and conferences. An idea I would like to realize is giving more expository space to the Etruscan period.

The first thing that comes to your mind thinking of this region…

Assisi and San Francesco that have made it famous, but Umbria must be more valued even in the historical and artistic fields.  This suggests major attention to the means of transport system, considering the difficulty in reaching it.

The “Spaccatura del Lecce” is marvelous: this stone crest rises up to 70 meters and is a real colossus. When you start walking and you see it in the background, imposing and majestic, you understand how much erosive can be water.

INGREDIENTS FOR 4 PEOPLE
  • 1.5 kg of freshwater shrimp
  • A few leaves of mint
  • fresh marjoram
  • parsley
  • garlic
  • 3 tablespoons of white wine vinegar
  • 6 tablespoons of extravirgin olive oil
  • salt
  • pepper

 

 

PREPARATION

Put a pot with salt water on the stove and, when it boils, add the prawns. Cook for 7-8 minutes, until they have turned red; drain and let it cool. In the meantime, chop mint, parsley, marjoram and garlic, mix with oil and vinegar, salt and pepper. Remove the shell, then the intestines; place them in a bowl, season with the sauce and serve.

 

This recipe belongs  from the area of Terni, where there is Piediluco lake. In Norcia and in Foligno, people made fried shrimps instead: tails, once clean, are fried in hot oil, salt and pepper. In areas where water offered shrimp, those who fished them put them in large buckets and then passed through the streets of the city to sell them.

 

 

Courtesy of Calzetti-Mariucci Editore.

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